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A Brutalist Art Oasis In The Mexican Mountains

Walkthrough this adroit home and art garden in the mountains

architect Ludwig Godefroy and interior designer Emmanuel Picault Brutalist Mexican house in the mountains

architecture & interior

Brutalist compositions coupled with organic Modernism on the Tepozteco Mountains act as a tranquil escape from the metropolis of Mexico City. The concrete forms of Santa Catarina House, designed by interior designer Emmanuel Picault, are perfectly considered to protect residents from the acoustic and social chaos that consumes Mexico’s capital a short drive away.

 

architect Ludwig Godefroy and interior designer Emmanuel Picault Brutalist Mexican house in the mountains

The long, thin swimming pool becomes a lightbox at night and also features an orange 1950s sculpture in the shape of a Mexican snake. (Photo: Javier Salas, The New Mediterranean)

Renowned French interior designer Picault took a minimalist approach to this country home that blends Latin warmth with the austerity of concrete in a poetic way. Taking a leaf from masters such as Marcel Breuer and Carlo Scarpa, the end result is an introverted art mid-century compound that sits in the shadows of the Mexican mountain range. They also took references from ancient temples in Petra and Damascus, plus Mayan culture which has defined the surrounding area for centuries.

 

architect Ludwig Godefroy and interior designer Emmanuel Picault Brutalist Mexican house in the mountains

The living area combines art and design pieces that nod to Modernism. (Photo: Javier Salas, The New Mediterranean)

Whitewashed walls, stone, and concrete bound the facade of Santa Catarina House. The garden and scenery allude to a setting completely removed from the bedlam of skyscrapers, city vendors, and congested avenues. Sculptures and art from the 1950s to 1960s decorate the interior and exterior. Mayan symbols made by Spero Daltas adorn the entrance, a 1950s sculpture of a snake in a bright shade of orange overlooks the greenery and swimming pool, alongside artwork by Théo Mercier. Inside an armchair by Harry Bertoia and a lamp by Eugenio Escudero glistens over the Moroccan Berber carpet. 

 

architect Ludwig Godefroy and interior designer Emmanuel Picault Brutalist Mexican house in the mountains

At the entrance are Mayan symbols made by Spero Daltas in the 1960s. (Photo: Javier Salas, The New Mediterranean)

Combining rustic, earthy tones with colorful fabrics, the Santa Catarina House encompasses all the aesthetics of an emerging, contemporary style studied in our book The New Mediterranean. Find out more about this Brutalist escape in the mountains, plus dozens of over profiles championing this more vibrant modernism.

Find out more about this movement through The New Mediterranean. Available in German and English.


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